Roof Framing 101 Volume 2.0 is Finally Here!!

Get your copy today!

Learn how build Bastard/Irregular Hip Roof!

FacebookTwitterShare
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Why a construction calculator is important?

Just like so many other specialized crafts, certain tools are required for roof framing. The list of them really isn’t that long, but each one on it is important for performing specific task at each stage of the total project is the Construction Calculator.

#1 The Construction Calculator

construction calculatorNow the first one that comes to mind, is a construction calculator. These aren’t like normal calculators. Rather, they are programmed to perform specific functions that you just won’t find in your run of the mill pocket calculator.

For instance, this type of construction calculator converts standard measurements to metrics. The reason for this, is that mathematical equations can’t be done with feet, inches, yards etc. They have to be done in metrics that uses increments of ten.

These types of construction calculators are also programmed to perform the Pythagoras function. This is a mathematical equation that’s used to determine the length of the hypotenuse of a right triangle. It’s commonly used to determine the lengths of roof rafters.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4935783

FacebookTwitterShare
Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

How to Build a Roof Quickly

how to build a roofHow to build a roof? Well it is quite easy if you follow a few simple basic rules of good construction techniques and safety. Depending upon what you are roofing, the steps can be quite different Let’s start with a small shed project. A very quick roof can be installed using sheets of fiberglass panels. These panels vary in width but the most common sizes are twenty-four and thirty inch wide panels. Thirty six inch panels are available at some retailers as well. Lengths are generally twelve feet but eight foot and ten foot long sheets are also available.

When learning how to build a roof you need to know that roof framing generally falls into two types or styles. Standard American framing and trusses. Framing members for roof rafters are sized according to the height, slope and span of the roof. A small shed may be framed with two by six or two by eight rafters where a house will have two by ten and two by twelve rafter sizes. The shallower the roof slope the larger the framing members used to carry the roof and snow loads. A flat roof roof is possible but requires the use of beams and horizontal framing to carry the roof loads. Usually a sloped roof is far more prevalent.

Standard framing will consist of multiple rafters and a ridge beam. A much quicker frame is to use a shed style framing system especially when you are just learning how to build a roof. This requires no ridge beam, can be installed by one person and with no ridge is less costly as well. It is desirable to obtain a four on twelve slope for your roof. That means the roof will drop from the high side to the low side by four inches per foot of travel. If your shed is twelve foot wide, then the drop should be forty eight inches. If your slope is less than that, say three on twelve or two on twelve, you will have to use larger rafters and a product called rolled roofing in lieu of standard shingles. This helps prevent ice backup under the shingles due to the flatter roofs lesser ability to shed water quickly.

Once you have your framing completed one of the fastest roofs to install is plain plywood with rolled roofing. If you wish something more eye appealing and the ability to let light into your building, use fiberglass sheets as discussed in paragraph one. These go up quickly and once nailed into place, become a finished product. They are inexpensive and require virtually no maintenance when you are learning how to build a roof.

When learning how to build a roof it’s good to know about fiberglass roofing panels require a slightly different framing method than conventional roofs. In addition to the standard rafters or trusses you must install what are known as Girts. Typically two inch by four lumber they are installed in a continuing line perpendicular to the rafter framing at two foot intervals with one at the top and one at the bottom of the roof edges and two foot spaces or less in between. The fiberglass panels will span across the girts and the girts will provide adequate places to fasten the panels. If a panel is not long enough to span the entire roof, panels may be lapped over each other and by using lap sealant, provide a very sturdy roof. Panels are usually fastened with ring shank nails and a rubber grommets to seal nail holes from seeping in water. Screws are quite often used as well as they will not back out or loosen over time. Cost is a few dollars more but much less maintenance later on.

There are also available sponge seals for both ends of the sheets where they sit on the edge beams or plates and for any sheet laps that are made. These are very inexpensive and avoids having to custom cut some type of wooden closure strip at the sheet ends.

Another quick roof but not in my opinion as attractive, is the use of roll roofing. Roll roofing will last for many years and really requires only minimal checking to assure the lapped seams have not opened to the weather. After your framing is completed, install your plywood sheets. If you are using twenty-four inch spacing of the rafters a minimum plywood size is 5/8 of an inch thick. 3/4 inch ply is better but costs a great a deal more. You want to minimize substrate movement to avoid cracking of the asphalt seals on the rolled roofing material. The stiffer the substrate, the less trouble you will have in the future. If you framed at sixteen inch centers, 5/8 ply is more than sufficient. Roll roofing is applied somewhat like regular fiberglass shingles but uses far less nails and covers much roof area more quickly with each course. Standard roll roofing is thirty or thirty-six inches wide. It is available in several colors to pick from. Warm areas pick white or light colors, Northern areas pick dark colors if you are heating the shed or garage. The dark color will help absorb the sun’s heat and aid in melting snow and providing a little free solar warmth to the roof area.

When learning how to build a roof it’s good to Startout at the bottom edge or eave of the roof install the starter course nailing the sheet firmly down with at both the top and bottom edges. The use of galvanized roofing nails is mandatory. Install the second sheet overlapping the lower sheet by the manufactures requirements. Roofing is usually marked with a different colored line to show the required overlap. I have seen both four inch and six inch laps required. Note that each layer on the bottom of the sheet has an asphalt coating on the underside. Once the sun heats the sheets, this asphalt will melt and seal the joints between the two sheets. If roofing is being installed in the winter time, roofers will use a torch to heat and seal the laps. Be very careful if you attempt to do this. Over heating the roofing can cause the roofing to melt and in the worst case, set fire to the structure below. It takes very little heat to seal the sheets so work very carefully so as not to damage them. Once done, apply roofing sealant using a caulking gun to any exposed nail heads.

On larger structures such as a full sized home, metal roofing sheets are used in lieu of fiberglass sheets. Although more expensive than conventional shingles on the outset, many companies guarantee their sheeting for fifty years or longer. Roll roofing is generally not used on homes as the appearance is not as nice looking as shingles.

One word about safety. when working on any roof make sure you always have safe and secure footing. A safety harness is always a good idea and can save you a broken leg or worse from a fall. Make sure ladders are properly secured in place as well unless you want to sit on a roof all day waiting for someone to come and stand the ladder back up. When learning how to build a roof this is very important! Be careful!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5554552

FacebookTwitterShare
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

How to Build a Roof Quickly

How to build a roof
How to build a roof is quite easy if you follow a few simple basic rules of good construction techniques and safety. Depending upon what you are roofing, the steps can be quite different Let’s start with a small shed project. A very quick roof can be installed using sheets of fiberglass panels. These panels vary in width but the most common sizes are twenty-four and thirty inch wide panels. Thirty six inch panels are available at some retailers as well. Lengths are generally twelve feet but eight foot and ten foot long sheets are also available.

How to build a roof generally falls into two types or styles. Standard American framing and trusses. Framing members for roof rafters are sized according to the height, slope and span of the roof. A small shed may be framed with two by six or two by eight rafters where a house will have two by ten and two by twelve rafter sizes. The shallower the roof slope the larger the framing members used to carry the roof and snow loads. A flat roof roof is possible but requires the use of beams and horizontal framing to carry the roof loads. Usually a sloped roof is far more prevalent.

Standard framing will consist of multiple rafters and a ridge beam. A much quicker frame is to use a shed style framing system. This requires no ridge beam, can be installed by one person and with no ridge is less costly as well. It is desirable to obtain a four on twelve slope for your roof. That means the roof will drop from the high side to the low side by four inches per foot of travel. If your shed is twelve foot wide, then the drop should be forty eight inches. If your slope is less than that, say three on twelve or two on twelve, you will have to use larger rafters and a product called rolled roofing in lieu of standard shingles. This helps prevent ice backup under the shingles due to the flatter roofs lesser ability to shed water quickly.

How to build a roofOnce you have your framing completed one of the fastest roofs to install is plain plywood with rolled roofing. If you wish something more eye appealing and the ability to let light into your building, use fiberglass sheets as discussed in paragraph one. These go up quickly and once nailed into place, become a finished product. They are inexpensive and require virtually no maintenance but are easy if your looking at how to build a roof.

Fiberglass roofing panels require a slightly different framing method than conventional roofs. In addition to the standard rafters or trusses you must install what are known as Girts. Typically two inch by four lumber they are installed in a continuing line perpendicular to the rafter framing at two foot intervals with one at the top and one at the bottom of the roof edges and two foot spaces or less in between. The fiberglass panels will span across the girts and the girts will provide adequate places to fasten the panels. If a panel is not long enough to span the entire roof, panels may be lapped over each other and by using lap sealant, provide a very sturdy roof. Panels are usually fastened with ring shank nails and a rubber grommets to seal nail holes from seeping in water. Screws are quite often used as well as they will not back out or loosen over time. Cost is a few dollars more but much less maintenance later on when your looking at how to build a roof.

There are also available sponge seals for both ends of the sheets where they sit on the edge beams or plates and for any sheet laps that are made. These are very inexpensive and avoids having to custom cut some type of wooden closure strip at the sheet ends.

Another quick roof but not in my opinion as attractive, is the use of roll roofing. Roll roofing will last for many years and really requires only minimal checking to assure the lapped seams have not opened to the weather. After your framing is completed, install your plywood sheets. If you are using twenty-four inch spacing of the rafters a minimum plywood size is 5/8 of an inch thick. 3/4 inch ply is better but costs a great a deal more. You want to minimize substrate movement to avoid cracking of the asphalt seals on the rolled roofing material. The stiffer the substrate, the less trouble you will have in the future. If you framed at sixteen inch centers, 5/8 ply is more than sufficient. Roll roofing is applied somewhat like regular fiberglass shingles but uses far less nails and covers much roof area more quickly with each course. Standard roll roofing is thirty or thirty-six inches wide. It is available in several colors to pick from. Warm areas pick white or light colors, Northern areas pick dark colors if you are heating the shed or garage. The dark color will help absorb the sun’s heat and aid in melting snow and providing a little free solar warmth to the roof area when your looking at how to build a roof.

When your looking at how to build a roof starting at the bottom edge or eave of the roof install the starter course nailing the sheet firmly down with at both the top and bottom edges. The use of galvanized roofing nails is mandatory. Install the second sheet overlapping the lower sheet by the manufactures requirements. Roofing is usually marked with a different colored line to show the required overlap. I have seen both four inch and six inch laps required. Note that each layer on the bottom of the sheet has an asphalt coating on the underside. Once the sun heats the sheets, this asphalt will melt and seal the joints between the two sheets. If roofing is being installed in the winter time, roofers will use a torch to heat and seal the laps. Be very careful if you attempt to do this. Over heating the roofing can cause the roofing to melt and in the worst case, set fire to the structure below. It takes very little heat to seal the sheets so work very carefully so as not to damage them. Once done, apply roofing sealant using a caulking gun to any exposed nail heads.

On larger structures such as a full sized home, metal roofing sheets are used in lieu of fiberglass sheets. Although more expensive than conventional shingles on the outset, many companies guarantee their sheeting for fifty years or longer. Roll roofing is generally not used on homes as the appearance is not as nice looking as shingles.

One word about safety. when working on any roof make sure you always have safe and secure footing. A safety harness is always a good idea and can save you a broken leg or worse from a fall. Make sure ladders are properly secured in place as well unless you want to sit on a roof all day waiting for someone to come and stand the ladder back up. Be careful when your looking at how to build a roof.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5554552

FacebookTwitterShare
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Shed Roof Designs

Shed Roof

The shed roof design that you choose will have a major influence on the appearance of your shed. Take a few moments to review the five major styles to make sure that you end up with a shed roof that you feel comfortable with.

1. The simplest shed roof design is the mono pitch or pent roof

shed roofThis type of roof is a gentle slope to encouraging rain-water to run off. When building a house extension this style is also known as a ‘shed roof‘. This type of roof is useful where the overall shed height is controlled by the local city council. A point to watch here is that the covering is waterproof for the low roof slope.

2. The gable roof/shed roof is a style we are all familiar with.

This type of roof has a central ridge and equal slopes downwards either side of the ridge. Make sure with this design that the covering can cope with the roof slope. Clay tiles often need a minimum roof pitch of 35 degrees (8 in 12), asphalt tiles with underlayment about 18 degrees (4 in 12).

3. The Salt box/ shed roof is a popular style in the United States.

With this style the ridge line of the roof is displaced to about one third of the way back from the front wall and the roof will typically have equal slopes of 12 in 12 on each side. Watch out when this style is used on pre-made sheds, basic formula is often tampered with. making the shed look unbalanced and out of place.

4. The Gambrel/ shed roof or barn roof is often known as a colonial Dutch barn.

This type of shed has a central ridge, each side starts off sloping gently and then about midway along the roof the slopes increases steeply. The great thing with this type of shed is the extra head room at the eaves. The extra headroom can be benefited from in two ways:

For low wall sheds the whole shed has a light airy feel.

Using a higher sidewall the ground floor can be fully utilised and a loft space created above for additional storage.

5. The hip roof / shed roof style is often considered the most attractive.

The hipped roof is similar to the gable style but the ends of the roof slope up to the ridge rather than being a vertical face. The hipped ends reduce the visual bulk of the shed and are an attractive architectural feature. The hip roof style is often used on summerhouses where roof storage is not a strong requirement, they can be slightly more complex to build than the gable roof, but to my mind well worth it.

Hopefully you enjoyed this article about a shed roof.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1897235




FacebookTwitterShare
Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Roof Framing 101 Volume 1.0 is Here!!

Roof Framing 101

Get your copy of Roof Framing 101 today!…….

 

Finally, The Secrets of Roof Cutting Unlocked!

Roof Framing 101 Vol. 1.0

Learn the secrets taught in this video like never before.

This is the Edge you’ve been looking for!

 

 

 

 

FacebookTwitterShare
Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Roof Framing 101 Volume 2.0 getting closer

"Hip Roof"

Roof Framing 101 Volume 2.0 has started the filming process! Soon as never before there will be a full length DVD showing how to build a hip roof with irregular/bastard Hips and Valley’s.

In this DVD we will be explaining how to frame a complete hip roof with a pitch combination of 12/12 and 8/12!  We will show you how to keep the overhang the same by offsetting the hips and valley’s and raising the heel height it certain areas to make it all fit like a glove…. But most importantly how to Calc it, before you Cut it!  The secrets of roof cutting will be unlocked like never before…..

See Pictures below

Hip Roof Hip Roof

Hip Roof Hip Roof

Never again after you watch this video will you be afraid to take on a full bastard hip roof again!  This video will give you the confidence you need to look like a pro….

FacebookTwitterShare
Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Volume 1.0 is Almost Here!!

"Hip Roof"

Roof Framing 101 Volume 1.0 is nearing completion! The filming was completed on the hip roof today and all that’s left is the editing process!

In this DVD we will be explaining how to frame a complete hip roof!  But most importantly how to Calc it, before you Cut it!  The secrets of roof cutting will be unlocked like never before…..

See the pictures below

Hip Roof "Hip Roof"

Never again after you watch this video will you be afraid to take on a full hip roof again!  This video will give you the confidence you need to look like a pro….

 

Don’t forget to check back soon for it’s much anticipated release….

FacebookTwitterShare
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Is a Framing Square Important to Have in Your Toolbox?

 Framing Square

There are many tools that you must have handy when building a house
(i.e. Framing Square) but there are a few that get used often in the building process.

I’ll start with the obvious. A hammer. In this day and age, many
builders use compressors and framing nailers. The hammer still has a
place on the job site. Most carpenters still use the hammer to frame
floor joists, walls, ceiling joists and rafters. The feeling is that
they can draw connections tighter with a hammer. I’m in favor of using
a hammer for framing and using a nail gun to nail off plywood on
decks, walls and roofs.  Framing Square

Framing SquareAnother obvious tool is the circular saw. I like to have at least two
on the job. one for me to do laying out of plates and roof cutting and
one for the crew to cut headers, cripples and whatever else they might
need it for. I prefer a worm drive saw. Its a heavier saw but I like
to use that to my advantage when cutting. I also like the fact you can
see the blade cut the line. Others prefer what is called a sidewinder.
The blade is on the other side of the saw thus the name. A righthanded
user will usually find himself leaning over the saw to see the blade
and follow the cut line. This is a lighter saw so it may fatigue the
user less than a worm drive.  It is also easier run the saw fence along side the framing square with a worm drive.

Layout tools. These include pencil, speed square, framing square,
chalk line, dry line and tape measure. Obviously the pencil is a
companion to most of the other tools for making layout marks and
lines. The speed square is used primarily to square lumber and laying
out plates for wall, floor joist, ceiling joists, and rafters. It can
also be used for rafter cutting layout but I prefer a framing
square, which I feel is more accurate. The framing square is also used
to square up wider lumber like 2×10′s and 2×12′s. Pages can be written
on the many uses of a framing square. I’ve even heard stories of guys
being able to figure their paychecks with one. A chalk line is a
necessity and is one of the first tools used to start building a
house. Lines are snapped on top of foundation walls, on decks for wall
layout and for cut lines on plywood, OSB and wall sheathings. A dry
line is used to keep things straight. Its used to straighten tops of
walls, basement steel, and hip rafters among other things. Last but
not least is the tape measure, the most important of the layout tools.
It would be impossible to build a house without it.

There are also what I like to call lifting and persuading tools. A handy tool to have on site is a prybar. On my jobs its primary
function was to lift a wall to put a 2×4 block under the top plate.
This is for finger room when it is time to lift the wall. The main
persuader on any job is the sledgehammer. Also called a trim hammer
for moving that heavy wall that last 1/8th of an inch to the line. I
also like to use it to tap a wall square before sheathing it,(a framing square can help with this). Another
necessary use for the sledgehammer is to tap tongue and groove plywood
decking together.

Don’t forget the erasers and you framing square. Sometimes we make mistakes. That is why we
keep nail pullers (cats paw) and a sawzall or reciprocating saw on
hand. I prefer the sawzall. I like to cut the nails rather than pull
them. I feel its quicker and makes for a cleaner job.

Don’t forget a 4 foot level or a framing square. I almost did. This is considered a layout
tool. You’ll need one to level interior walls to brace them off and to
install window and doors. Other than that, it is almost all you’ll need
it for except for an occasional check for plumb and level.

With the above mentioned tools like a framing square, etc., you have got what you need to build a
house.

FacebookTwitterShare
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Modern House Framing and the Pythagorean Theorem

Roof Pitch

The relationship between carpentry and the Pythagorean Theorem is believed to be around 4,000 years old, even though we usually use for roof pitch and squaring. The modern house framing industry would not be possible without the use of this theorem. It is applied in nearly all aspects of home building. Some examples would be roof framing, squaring foundations, and walls to name just a few.

The Pythagorean Theorem is believed to have originated around 2,000 B.C. The ancient Egyptians needed a way not to establish roof pitch but rather to lay out square corners for their fields. The way this was accomplished is amazingly simple yet very effective. They used three stakes arranged in a triangle and a length of rope knotted into twelve equal lengths. They would then stretch the rope around the three stakes until they had three knots between the first two stakes, four knots between the next two stakes, and five knots between the last two stakes. Thus the hypotenuse of the right triangle was formed.

A Greek philosopher and mathematician, born around 530 B.C., named Pythagoras became famous for formulating the Pythagorean Theorem. Even though the historians have given him credit, it was certainly known much earlier.

When referring to a right triangle, one angle equals 90 degrees, the hypotenuse is on the opposite side and equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides. The formula for the theorem is A squared + B squared = C squared with C being the hypotenuse. When building houses, since two sides are usually known, this method is extremely accurate when squaring footings and foundation walls or establishing roof pitch.

In conventional house framing, roof framing using roof pitch is one of the more complex issues carpenters are faced with. With the use of a framing square and a working knowledge of the Pythagorean Theorem, roof framing is more accurate and efficient. The design of the framing square is based on this principal of mathematics. On the rafter tables and brace measurement portion of the square, these numbers are generated using the Pythagorean Theorem.

When the theorem is used in conjunction with computer software to generate roof pitch, foundation, floor, wall, and roof framing plans, it will increase quality, productivity, and decrease waste. If quality and productivity are increased and waste reduced, it can only lead to one outcome, higher quality finished homes, an increased profit margin, and higher customer satisfaction. This is a definite win win situation for the builder and homeowner alike.

The author of this article has 29 years of experience working in the highly competitive housing market of the west and southwest suburbs of Chicago as a carpenter. His job titles have included Master Roof Cutter, Apprentice, and everything in between. Most of his experience is in the high end custom home marketplace, including all aspects of fine homebuilding, from footings to ridge cap. His website contains more information on House Framing and the Pythagorean Theorem and roof pitch.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Rickie_Bell

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1231413

FacebookTwitterShare
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment